South African Army Week Celebrations, 22 to 26 November 2010

Formation Scripts by: Colonel Sidney Zeeman, SA Army Corporate Communication


The guests attending the Awards Evening and the Gala Evening were entertained by a musical programme paying tribute to the different corps of the SA Army. The SA Army is the primary contributor to the landward defence of our country. The entertainment programme was dedicated to the brave men and women of the different corps who, when operating in an integrated manner, enable the SA Army to execute its mission.

SA Army Air Defence Artillery Corps

SA Army Air Defence Artillery

 

 

 

 


The SA Army Air Defence Artillery or ADA comprising two Regular Units and four Reserve units. The Air Defence Artillery provides a ground-based air defence capability and prepares forces for Major Combat Operations as well as for operations other than war. The ground-based air defence systems are optimised for Mobile Air Defence, Mechanised Air Defence and Airmobiled Air Defence. The Air Defence Artillery Formation was proud to be an integral part of the securing of air space at all the major stadiums during the Soccer World Cup 2010.

The band performed music by Micheal Buble as arranged by Major Fourie, musical director of this event, as we honour the men and women of the SA Army Air Defence Artillery!

SA Army Armour Corps

SA Army Armour

 

 

 

 

 

The defensive strategy of the SA National Defence Force is based on ‘credible deterrence’ to ensure that the people, sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Republic of South Africa are not threatened by potential aggressors. The role of the South African Armoured Corps is to provide the crux of the credible landward deterrence of the SA National Defence Force. Armour elements provide the firepower, manoeuvre and shock effect required to destroy the opponent’s centre of gravity and as such is the basic manoeuvre element of all mobile conventional operations. Although primarily structured and trained to conduct major combat operations, the Armour Corps is inherently a multi-role force and often deployed in operations other than war. With 4 Regular and 7 Reserve units, the Armour Corps specialises in harmonising the capabilities of its human resources and its machines in defensive operations, to secure the territorial integrity of the Republic of South Africa and the safety of all South Africans.

Bands play "Queen in Concert" as arranged by Jay Bocook and under the baton of Maj Fourie as we give recognition to the South African Armour Corps!

SA Army Corps of Signallers

SA Corps of Signallers

 

 

 

 

 

As we celebrate the South African Army, many of its soldiers, men and women, are deployed in Peace Support Operations in Africa or on our borders. Many of them will not be at home during this Festive season. Internally our support to the nation was typified with the deployment of our soldiers during the Soccer World Cup 2010. Code named Operation Kgwele, the SA Army rendered indispensable support, with none more so than the SA Army Corps of Signallers. With 7 Regular and 4 Res units, the mission of the Signal Formation is to provide Signal Support to the SA Army and Special Signal Services to the Department of Defence. During the World Cup, vital communication links were established, ensuring a blanket communication network that all security agencies could rely on.

Waka Waka by Shakira was the official song for the 2010 Soccer World Cup and is now performed by our bands as we salute all our men and women who sacrifice themselves in support of the national objective - to ensure a better life for all in South Africa! Bands play ‘Waka Waka’.

SA Army Reserve Pipe Bands

SA Army Reserve Irish and Scottish Pipe Bands

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                       

 

 

 

 

The Reserve Pipe bands have become an integral part of the South African Army culture. They represent only a small part of the Reserves who are playing an ever increasing role in securing a safe environment for Southern Africa and all its people. The SA Army Reserves supplement the Regulars in Peace Support Operations, Border Safeguarding, administrative - and guard duties. The Reserves were deployed externally in Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and in the Darfur region of the Sudan. In the previous financial year more than 10 000 Reserve members were called up for active duty. As equal partners in the “One Force Concept” the Army Reserves are serving with pride.

On stage with us - the members of the South African Irish Regiment and the Transvaal Scottish under the baton of Maj Strugnell with ‘The Green Glens of Atrim and Star of County Down’!

SA Army Support Corpse

SA Army Support Formation

 

 

 

 


There are many unsung heroes in the South African Army. Most of them operate behind the scenes whilst delivering crucial support in sustaining our forces. Our Personnel Service Corps, managing our human resources; the Ordnance Service Corps, ensuring the steady supply of logistical requirements; the Technical Service Corps or tiffies as they are fondly referred to, maintaining our prime mission equipment and vehicle fleets; the Catering Corps keeping the Army marching on full stomachs; our Fire and Rescue Services; the Chaplains tending to the spiritual requirements; the Corps of Musicians, some of whom are in action here on stage; and those managing specialised environments such as Corporate Communication, Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Services; all these men and women form the foundation on which the SA Army can prepare and sustain combat ready forces for deployment when called on.

The melody ‘Last of the Great Whales’ is a moving Celtic piece performed by the Pipe Bands, and this we dedicate to these soldiers who carry the SA Army on their shoulders.

SA Army Infantry Corps

SA Army Infantry

 

 

 

 

‘The least spectacular arm of the Army, yet without them you cannot win a battle. Indeed without them you can do nothing at all; nothing.’ These were the words of Field Marshall Montgomery and are still applicable today. The South African Infantry comprises mechanised, parachute and motorised forces - each of them specialising in specific infantry operations. They form the backbone of the South African Army and constitute the bulk of our forces deployed in Peace Support Operations, border protection and operations other than war. Infantry battalions are deployed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Darfur in Sudan. Although inundated with difficulties and often under hostile fire, these deployments have been very successful. Equally successful has been the deployment of infantry soldiers on our borders and, since taking over from the Police Service, hundreds of illegal immigrants have been arrested and millions of Rands worth of contraband and other stolen goods confiscated. Internally they provided the forces deployed in support of the 2010 Soccer World Cup, were called on to assist in curbing xenophobic attacks and provided protection to the Medical Health Services during the recent civil servants’ strikes. The Infantry soldier is the most mobile and adaptable element on the battlefield, and - as it relies on the spirit of man rather than the efficiency of machines - it is also the most powerful – the ‘Queen of the Battlefield’.

We dedicate the ‘Umkhonto and Ipi N’tombi’ medley to them, featuring melodies from the 1974 South African musical hit; a selection of other indigenous South African music; and ‘Umkhonto’, an original march written by Maj Dawie Fourie as the new SA National Defence Force song. We give you the ‘Umkhonto and Ipi N’tombi Medley’ under the baton of Maj Fourie as we pay tribute to the Infantry soldier.

SA Army Engineers Corps

SA Army Engineers

 

 

 

 


‘Billy Joel in Concert’ is a selection of music from the pianist, singer and songwriter, Billy Joel. It was arranged by Warren Barker and includes some of his greatest hits, such as ‘Movin Out’, ‘Piano Man’, and ‘Just the way you are’. This performance is dedicated to those soldiers whose responsibility it is to enhance the mobility and survivability of own forces – the South African Corps of Engineers. This task is executed by well trained combat engineers, operational construction – and terrain intelligence personnel. The Engineers or Sappers are extensively utilised in support of operational deployments both internally and in Africa. During October 2009 and March 2010, the Engineers in support of Special Works Programmes in the Eastern Cape, built three bridges in rural communities, thereby shortening commuting distances and making a difference in the lives of the people staying there. Social support also came in the form of renovations to a crčche in catering for military personnel and support to the Soccer World Cup with the provisioning of Geographical Information Systems teams in all nine provinces.

We dedicate ‘Billy Joel in Concert’ to them the Engineers.

SA Army Intelligence Corps

SA Army Intelligence

 

 

 

 

 

.No operational mission can be undertaken without a sound knowledge of what our own soldiers will be up against. This vital information is a pre-requisite for all operational planning. (Similarly) In the same way, own forces need to be protected against any attempt by hostile elements to gain information, to sabotage equipment and facilities or to undermine morale. This is the responsibility of our Intelligence Corps and they do so by providing Intelligence and Operational Security specialists to all Headquarters in the South African Army.

To the eyes and ears of our forces, we dedicate ‘Nessun Dorma’ – None Shall Sleep – from the final act of Puccini’s ‘Turandot’. Our vocalist, L Cpl Thapelo Molusi.

SA Army Artillery Corps

SA Army Artillery

 

 

 

 

   
The 1812 Overture was written by the Russian composer Tchaikovsky in 1880. The piece was written to commemorate Russia’s defence of Moscow against Napoleon’s advancing Grand Armeč at the Battle of Borodino in 1812. The overture is best known for its climatic volley of gun fire and the ringing church bells signifying victory. This piece is therefore appropriately dedicated to the Artillery Corps. Their motto PRIMA INCEDIRE-EXIRE ULTIMUS translated as First In Last Out is symbolic of the role and function of the Artillery Corps in providing the right fire at the right time and the right place, thereby ensuring the success of any operation.

There are nine regiments throughout the country where forces are prepared to provide both a medium and light composite capability, the last of which also includes airborne artillery. Take note that as in the original piece, guns will fire on key tonight. The gun crews of the Light Artillery Regiment will be in action just outside the venue tonight.

The 1812 Overture performed by the bands of the National Ceremonial Guard, the Support Base Kroonstad and the gun crews of the Light Artillery Regiment.

SA Army Deployed Soldiers

The lives of our soldiers and personnel are on the line at this very moment, with their deployment in Peace Missions on the continent and on our borders. We bring honour and thanks to our Heavenly Father as under His protection, no soldier succumbed to hostile actions or operational accidents during deployments or training thus far this year. Many of our men and women will however not be with their families during this festive period. Many of them were also not home during birthdays or when children were born during the past year. We acknowledge these sacrifices by the soldiers of the South African Army and salute them.

Bands play “Here’s to the Heroes”by John Barry.